Transcript: What's in Bannock? | May 29, 2019

Carl is in his sixties, with short straight white hair and wears a burgundy shirt. He stands behind a kitchen counter holding a ceramic bowl full of flour.

A man behind the camera says HOLD IT UP LIKE THIS.
OR JUST IN FRONT OF YOU.
(LAUGHING)
HOLD-- HOLD THE FLOUR.
NATURALLY!
KEEP LOOKING, KEEP LOOKING.

A caption reads "This is my father."

The caption changes to "He's going to make bannock, or as he calls it, scone."

The man says NOW YOU'RE GONNA JUST
LOOK IN THE CAMERA
AND KIND OF SMILE
A LITTLE BIT.

A picture of a type of flat bread appears.

Carl says NATIVE BREAD
IS WHAT WE CALLED IT.

The caption changes to "Bannock is a flat bread that is baked or fried."

Carl says HI THERE!
MY NAME IS CARL BEAVER.
I'M ALDERVILLE FIRST NATION
AND I'M GONNA MAKE SOME SCONE
FOR YOU GUYS.
(CHUCKLING)

The caption changes to "In North America, most Indigenous Nations have a version of bannock."

Carl says NO GOOD?
FIRST TO MAKE SCONE
YOU NEED FOUR CUPS OF FLOUR.

The caption changes to "Rooted in Gaelic, 'bannock' means morsel. Bannock, as we know it today, was introduced by Scottish fur traders in the 18th century."

Carl says ONE TEASPOON OF BAKING POWDER.
MIX IT UP GOOD.

The caption changes to "We now know that Indigenous versions existed before initial contact. Instead of wheat flour they used starch from the stems of ferns."

Carl says NOW WE'LL MIX SOME WATER IN IT.
SEE WHAT HAPPENS.

The caption changes to "Caloric value and simplicity made it perfect for life in the bush."

Carl says OH, DARN IT.
MY GREAT-GRANDMOTHER
USED TO SAY,
"OH, SAY, YOU MUST BE STARVED."
AND SHE'D GIVE US SCONE.

The caption changes to "In the reserve system, people had to survive on limited government rations such as flour and lard. Bannock became a staple of survival."

Carl says IF WE DIDN'T HAVE SCONE
BACK THEN
WE MIGHT HAVE STARVED TO DEATH.
A LOT OF US ATE SCONE.
SAVED A LOT OF LIVES
OVER THE YEARS.

He flattens his dough and says THAT LOOKS GOOD TO GO.
NOW WE'RE GONNA PUT A BIT OF
LARD IN THE FRYING PAN.
WE'RE GONNA COOK OUR SCONE
IN THERE.
LARD IS NOT THE HEALTHIEST,
BUT IT TASTES BETTER.
DON'T WANNA USE TOO MUCH.
THEN WE PUT OUR SCONE IN
AND LET IT COOK.
NOW WE PLAY THE WAITING GAME.
(SCONE SIZZLING)

Later, Carl says MY SCONE'S BEEN COOKING
FOR FIVE MINUTES.
I'M GONNA CHECK IT.
OH, LOOK AT HOW NICE IT IS.
LOOK AT THAT.
ANOTHER FIVE MINUTES
WE'LL HAVE SCONE.
(LAUGHING)
LOOK AT HOW NICE IT LOOKS.
YUM, YUM, YUM, YUM.
NO CALORIES IN IT, EITHER.

The caption changes to "Today, bannock is a beloved staple of Indigenous culture and cuisine."

Carl says WHAT GOES GOOD WITH SCONE
IS BEAN SOUP.
IT'S GOOD WITH BUTTER
AND PEANUT BUTTER.
I LIKE IT COLD
WITH PEANUT BUTTER
OR HOT WITH BUTTER.
I USED TO EAT IT WITH MUSTARD.
ANOTHER GOOD THING
THAT GOES WITH THIS IS FISH.
I USED TO EAT SUNFISH
WITH THIS.
OH, TALK ABOUT DELICIOUS.
THAT'S WHY I LOOK LIKE A FISH.
(CHUCKLES)
WELL, GONNA SEE IF IT'S COOKED.
NOT BAD.

He puts the bannock in a plate and says OH, SAY, YOU MUST BE STARVED.
THERE YOU GO.
EAT UP.
IS THAT IT? OH.
(LAUGHING)
OH, I DON'T KNOW HOW
MOVIE STARS CAN DO THIS.

Music plays as the end credits roll.

Video by Chris Beaver.

Manager of Digital Video, Hannah Sung.

Watch: What's in Bannock?